Someone Great by LCD Soundsystem Lyrics Meaning – The Poignant Truth of Loss and Continuation


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for LCD Soundsystem's Someone Great at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning

Lyrics

I wish that we could talk about it
But there, that’s the problem
With someone new I couldn’t start it
Too late, for beginnings
The little things that made me nervous
Are gone, in a moment
I miss the way we used to argue
Locked, in your basement

I wake up and the phone is ringing
Surprised, as it’s early
And that should be the perfect warning
That something’s a problem
To tell the truth I saw it coming
The way you were breathing
But nothing can prepare you for it
The voice on the other end

The worst is all the lovely weather
I’m stunned, it’s not raining
The coffee isn’t even bitter
Because, what’s the difference?
There’s all the work that needs to be done
It’s late, for revision
There’s all the time and all the planning
And songs, to be finished

And it keeps coming
And it keeps coming
And it keeps coming
‘Til the day it stops

And it keeps coming
And it keeps coming
And it keeps coming
‘Til the day it stops

And it keeps coming
And it keeps coming
And it keeps coming
And it keeps coming
And it keeps coming
And it keeps coming
And it keeps coming
‘Til the day it stops

I wish that we could talk about it
But there, that’s the problem
With someone new I could have started
Too late for beginnings
You’re smaller than my wife imagined
Surprised, you were human
There shouldn’t be this radio silence
But what are the options?

When someone great is gone
When someone great is gone
When someone great is gone
When someone great is gone

When someone great is gone
When someone great is gone
When someone great is gone
When someone great is gone

We’re safe, for the moment
Saved for the moment

Full Lyrics

James Murphy, the mastermind behind LCD Soundsystem, has always had a flair for fusing the poetic with the electronic, creating an alchemy of sound that resonates on a deeply human level. ‘Someone Great’ off their critically acclaimed album ‘Sound of Silver,’ is no exception and remains one of the band’s most haunting and reflective tracks. It’s a mournful ode dressed in the attire of electronic synth-pop, a eulogy to the unfathomable space that the ‘great’ ones leave behind.

Murphy’s songwriting prowess turns ‘Someone Great’ into an exploration of grief that is both personal and universal. Its repetitive nature and Murphy’s almost conversational lyrics manage to capture the mundane alongside the profound, crafting a narrative that transcends ordinary loss, speaking to the very heart of existential longing and the human condition. At its core, it is a reflection on mortality, memory, and the unstoppable march of time.

A Sonic Journey Through the Stages of Grief

The pulsating synths and the understated beat of ‘Someone Great’ lay down the groundwork for what is an auditory passage through the five stages of grief. Denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance ebb and flow throughout the song, conveyed not just lyrically but also through the music’s swelling crescendos and dissolving echoes. Murphy’s restrained vocals juxtapose the emotional weight of the lyrics, delivering them with a contemplative and at times detached demeanor that mirrors the numbness often associated with loss.

Listening to ‘Someone Great,’ one can’t help but feel caught in a liminal space – the in-between of clinging to the past and stepping forward into the unknowable future. The reflective melodies enable listeners to linger in their memories while simultaneously urging them to accept the relentless pace of life’s forward momentum.

The Metaphor of Mundane Moments

What makes ‘Someone Great’ truly compelling is its depiction of loss through the lens of ordinary life. The song’s lines meander through the trivialities of waking up to a phone ring or the unexpected pleasantness of good weather, bearing a sharp contrast to the profound emotional upheaval one goes through when someone significant is no longer around. This element highlights that grief doesn’t just occur in grand gestures or big moments but is present in the nuances of everyday life.

Murphy’s attention to the ‘little things’ – the bitter taste of coffee, an argument in the basement, the busy work that occupies our time – acts as a vehicle to showcase how everything changes yet stays disturbingly the same following a great loss. These references resonate with anyone who has experienced mourning, as they encapsulate how life’s most trivial aspects are redefined by the absence of a loved one.

The Hidden Meaning Behind the Repetition

The hypnotic repetition of ‘And it keeps coming, till the day it stops’ serves not only as a nod to the song’s electronic dance music roots but also as a metaphor for life’s unceasing continuity. Repetition here creates a sense of inertia, a reflection of how days blend into each other in the wake of tragedy, and how individuals trudge forward, often on autopilot, as they grapple with their loss.

This repetition can also symbolize the constant reminders of someone’s absence, the waves of realization that crash over us unexpectedly, echoing that life goes on relentlessly in the face of both the great and the terrible.

The Struggle for New Beginnings in the Face of Endings

LCD Soundsystem’s lyric ‘Too late, for beginnings’ offers a poignant acknowledgment of the difficulty in starting anew. It’s a stark reminder that in loss there’s often a feeling of paralysis, a challenge to the natural human inclination to look for fresh starts and new opportunities. Murphy encapsulates the shock and the halting realization that some endings are irreversible, and that life must now be navigated without the presence of someone who was once integral to it.

Moreover, the song touches on the complexity of forming new relationships amid grief, suggesting that the shadows of the ones we’ve lost loom heavily over any attempts to move on, coloring every interaction with the knowledge of what, and who, is missing.

Memorable Lines That Echo The Human Psyche

From the opening line, ‘I wish that we could talk about it, But there, that’s the problem,’ Murphy captures the profound sense of helplessness that accompanies loss. It distills the futility of wanting to communicate with those who have gone, of yearning for a resolution that cannot be found in the earthly realm.

And yet another haunting line, ‘When someone great is gone,’ hits like a wave crashing over a calm sea, simple and powerful, reverberating with the truth that the passing of someone meaningful leaves a void that is felt in the most profound, yet indescribable, ways. These lines, memorable in their clarity, encapsulate the essence of the song and remain etched in the listener’s mind long after the last note has played.

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