Bâtard – Decoding the Anthem of Identity Beyond Binaries


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Stromae's Bâtard at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. Beyond the Dichotomy – The Pursuit of Self in ‘Bâtard’
  5. A Scathing Indictment of Stereotypes Wrapped in Melody
  6. The Song’s Hidden Meaning: A Reflection on Modern-Day Tribalism
  7. Memorable Lines: The Courage to Defy Categorization
  8. Stromae’s Lyrical Genius: Weaving Complexity into the Danceable Beats

Lyrics

Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi
Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi
Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi
Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi
Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi

T’es de droite ou t’es de gauche?
T’es beauf ou bobo de Paris?
Sois t’es l’un ou soit t’es l’autre
T’es un homme ou bien tu péris
Cultrice ou patéticienne
Féministe ou la ferme
Sois t’es macho, soit homo
Mais t’es phobe ou sexuel
Mécréant ou terroriste
T’es veuch ou bien t’es barbu
Conspirationniste, illuminati
Mythomaniste ou vendu?
Rien du tout, ou tout tout de suite
Du tout au tout, indécis
Han, tu changes d’avis imbécile?
Mais t’es Hutu ou Tutsi?
Flamand ou Wallon?
Bras ballants ou bras longs?
Finalement t’es raciste
Mais t’es blanc ou bien t’es marron, hein?

Ni l’un, ni l’autre
Bâtard, tu es, tu l’étais, et tu le restes

Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi
Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi
Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi
Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi

Han, pardon, Monsieur ne prend pas parti
Monsieur n’est même pas raciste
Vu que Monsieur n’a pas de racines
D’ailleurs Monsieur a un ami noir, et même un ami Aryen
Monsieur est mieux que tout ça
D’ailleurs tout ça, bah ça ne sert à rien
Mieux vaut ne rien faire que de faire mal
Les mains dans la merde ou bien dans les annales
Trou du cul ou bien nombril du monde
Monsieur se la pète plus haut que son trou de balle
Surtout pas de coups de gueule, faut être calme, hein
Faut être doux, faut être câlin
Faut être dans le coup, faut être branchouille
Pour être bien vu partout, hein

Ni l’un, ni l’autre
Bâtard, tu es, tu l’étais, et tu le restes

Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi
Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi
Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi
Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi

Ni l’un, ni l’autre
Bâtard, tu es, tu l’étais, et tu le restes
Ni l’un, ni l’autre
Bâtard, tu es, tu l’étais, et tu le restes

Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi
Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi
Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi
Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi
Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi
Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi
Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi
Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi
Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi
Ni l’un ni l’autre, je suis, j’étais et resterai moi

Full Lyrics

Stromae, the Belgian musical visionary, weaves an intricate tapestry of modern identity in his song ‘Bâtard’. Not one to shy away from dissecting societal norms with a surgeon’s precision, Stromae delves deeply into the polarity that defines our categorizations and self-perceptions.

In ‘Bâtard’, a track saturated with poignant social commentary, Stromae challenges the listener to reflect on the boxes within which we imprison ourselves and others. Is identity really a matter of either/or? The song becomes a mirror to society’s zeal for clear-cut labels and the artist’s defiance against them.

Beyond the Dichotomy – The Pursuit of Self in ‘Bâtard’

At the core of ‘Bâtard’ lies the perennial struggle between self-identification and societal classification. With a refrain that resonates like a mantra, Stromae rejects the binary options he’s presented with, instead choosing the authenticity of ‘I am, I was, and I will remain myself’.

This assertion of individuality serves as a rallying cry for all who find themselves wedged between the limited choices imposed upon them – right or left, progressive or traditional, native or foreign. Stromae calls for a recognition of the full spectrum of identity that cannot be contained within neat polar opposites.

A Scathing Indictment of Stereotypes Wrapped in Melody

Verse by biting verse, Stromae delineates the caricatures and stereotypes that dominate public discourse: right or left-wing, intellectual or artist, feminist or quietist. Each label is delivered with a scorn that both criticizes the blind adherence to stereotypes and mocks the absurdity of these simplifications.

By questioning the validity of these socially constructed binaries, Stromae shines a light on the triviality and danger of pigeonholing not just individuals, but whole groups of people based on arbitrary characteristics.

The Song’s Hidden Meaning: A Reflection on Modern-Day Tribalism

Stromae goes beyond mere personal anguish to deliver a covert commentary on modern-day tribalism. His evocation of the Hutu and Tutsi reflects history’s grimmest moments where identities were matters of life and death. The allusion isn’t just historical; it’s a stark reminder of our persistent human failures.

In ‘Bâtard’, the artist points a finger at the human tendency to divide and label and how these often lead to conflict and discrimination. He refuses to be a part of this divisive categorization, declaring his individuality beyond inherited strife and artificial divisions.

Memorable Lines: The Courage to Defy Categorization

One cannot help but pause at the line, ‘Pardon, Monsieur doesn’t take sides’. Here, Stromae tackles the notion that neutrality is not always a virtue, especially when it becomes a façade for indifference. With poignant mockery, he addresses the complacency that often accompanies privilege.

‘Bâtard, you are, you were, and you will remain’ – the recurring words echo a sentiment of defiance and resilience. The term ‘bâtard’, often derogatory, is reclaimed as a badge of honor for those who dare to live beyond the constricts of conventional labels.

Stromae’s Lyrical Genius: Weaving Complexity into the Danceable Beats

The musical backdrop of ‘Bâtard’ is quintessentially Stromae – a danceable beat that belies the depth and gravity of the lyrics. Remarkably, the artist manages to create a song that can both ignite the dance floors and provoke profound dialogue on identity politics.

It is a unique skill to make listeners groove to the rhythm while simultaneously engaging with the complex nuances of identity. ‘Bâtard’ stands testament to Stromae’s remarkable ability as an artist to blur the lines between entertainment and enlightenment.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may also like...