“Eazy Sleazy” by Mick Jagger (ft. Dave Grohl)

As at the release of “Eazy Sleazy” Mick Jagger is not only a music legend but also very much a senior citizen. So he has full license to drop a song like this, and if he decides to do so the world, to some degree, is going to listen. 

And all lyrics considered, we can say that this is perhaps the most-critical song of the current state of affairs under the coronavirus we’ve come across since another elder statesman in the music industry, Eric Clapton, dropped “Stand and Deliver” back in December of 2020. And that particular song can even be considered tame compared to “Eazy Sleazy”.

But that being noted, this is not the easiest song to decipher. Yes, it is clear that Mick has issues with the way our leaders have responded to the virus, as well as the resultant reaction of the masses themselves. 

But the way many pop media outlets, as well as seemingly Jagger himself, have explained “Eazy Sleazy” is being against anti-vaxxers. Meanwhile the anti-vaxxing movement is normally part and parcel of criticisms concerning how leaders have responded to the virus, which again is what the lyrics of are clearly primarily based on. 

So it’s almost as if on one hand the singer is staunchly agreeing with conspiracy theorists – for lack of a better term. And on the other hand he is lambasting and ridiculing them.

Verse 1

The first verse points to, shall we say government bullying. That is what Jagger is referring to when he mentions being “bossed around by pr-cks”. But he, “the Mick”, is not privy to being told what to do under the circumstances. 

Or put more bluntly, we can go as far as to postulate that Sir Mick is one of those people who believe that the powers that be are using the pandemic to basically deceive, as well as bully, the people. But deceive and bully the masses into what? Into being more compliant to their authority. But he’s not stupid enough to fall for their trickery.

Verse 2

The vocalist then commences the second verse just as he did the first by, in a roundabout way, pointing to the notion that coronavirus statistics are being used to subjugate the masses. 

But this time around he gets more specific, noting restrictions on travel and congregating in public. And here we get our first hint of Mick’s lack of fondness as far as the virtual communications go, which in many settings have actually replaced public meetings. 

He then concludes the passage by stating that he’s “got nothing left to wear”, which sounds a bit out of place in relation to the rest of the stanza. But going out on a limb, for now we will hypothesize that this indirectly cites the fact that countless people have also lost their jobs due to the pandemic, i.e. being unable to afford new clothes. 

And musicians in particular were one of the professions most affected. That being said, outside of the song, Jagger has noted that he was quite okay throughout.

Chorus of “Eazy Sleazy”

That hypothesis concerning economic hardship is further buttressed around the beginning of the chorus. Here, Jags uses a well-known idiom suggesting people being stuck in perpetual debt. In other words, times are hard. You have restricted movement, and then on top of that you have a less-than-ideal cashflow.

But then as far as the rest of the chorus goes, it’s not as easy to decipher. This is the part of the song where the aforementioned duality is first introduced. 

Here, we have Jags expressing the belief that eventually this entire situation will pass and that even now things are “easy”. And at first glance, considering what has been put forth leading up to this point as well as other terms associated with those ideas, such as “freaky” (and later “sleazy”), it would appear that he is actually mocking them. 

Or put differently, he doesn’t really believe that living under the virus is easy, nor is he genuinely under the impression that things will ever revert back to how they once were, even though he says so.

But then considering that Mick’s self-stated goal is for this song to be imbued with “some much needed optimism”, who knows?

Verse 3

Afterwards in the third verse, the singer continues what appears to be a more-pointed tirade against the powers that be. And in doing so, he alludes to the forced usage of face masks. Or he is actually advocating their usage. Again, who exactly knows? 

Then, in summation, he proceeds to go about negatively criticizing the increased dependency on social media and television, a result of people pretty much being forced to stay home. And along those lines, Jagger also seems to suggest that being relegated to such a life is making dudes more effeminate.

Verse 4

The fourth verse, meanwhile, is supposedly the stanza in which the vocalist most evidently goes about dissing anti-vaxxers and conspiracy theorists. 

And in the process he not only makes fun of being afraid of vaccines by namedropping Bill Gates, who is sort of viewed as the devil himself as far as anti-vaxxers are concerned. But he also ridicules those who believe in the flat-Earth theory, influential extraterrestrials and the Second Coming, as well as people who don’t believe in global warming. 

Either that or perhaps less plausibly he is agreeing with them. Again given the overall nature of the song leading up to this point, it’s somewhat hard to tell.

Indeed by the end of it all, it is quite challenging trying to derive a definitive thesis sentiment from this track. It’s as if the narrator, in all of his different assertions, is on the roster of two opposing teams. 

Or let’s simply conclude by putting forth something like he agrees with just about every standard conspiracy theory concerning the coronavirus pandemic, except anti-vaxxing.

In Conclusion…

Once again in reference to Mick Jagger’s age, he’s from the old school. And the whole idea of not getting a vaccine even though a virus is raging, largely due to him being born in a more-trusting era, is impractical from him

So does he agree the government is using the onset of COVID-19 to trample on people’s rights?  Yes. Does he believe that forced lockdowns and the closing of public venues is BS? Apparently so. 

And does he also believe that we should shun the COVID-19 vaccine that is being propagated? No, dear reader. And that is where Mick Jagger differs from the type of person we would traditionally define as a present-day conspiracy theorist. 

Or instead, let’s say he can personally observe how the lockdowns themselves are detrimental and being used against the people. But coming to that realization does not make him a full-fledged conspiracy theorist.

Lyrics of "Eazy Sleazy"

Writing Credits for “Eazy Sleazy”

This song was written by Mick Jagger and Dave Grohl. The latter is a younger rock musician though well-known in his own right, fronting the Foo Fighters for over 20 years now and formerly being a member of the late Kurt Cobain’s Nirvana during the 1980s/90s. 

And as far as his feature on this track goes, according to Mick he served as the drummer, bassist and guitarist of the song.

Release of “Eazy Sleazy”

Meanwhile as of the release of this track on 13 April 2021, Mick Jagger has been the lead singer of The Rolling Stones for getting to 60 years now. The Rolling Stones is a group whose name is synonymous with rock n’ roll, perhaps being the greatest band which that genre has ever produced.

FYI

Mick Jagger is 25 years older than Dave Grohl. And Grohl has collaborated with The Rolling Stones themselves before, on record, on the live rendering of the track Bitch from the deluxe edition of the Stones’ 2019 album Honk.

1 Response

  1. Christina Durkin says:

    Ghost town showed a powerful & incredible insight into what the pandemic was to unfold on the world. Easy sleazy is lazy for a man of his intellect. Sadly, the era of ‘cock rock’ has been resigned to the 20th century. The 21st century is ‘The girls are on top the men are on the floor but ease up daughter ’cause he’s heading towards the door. There is still scope for rockers to have fun with this very different world. Leave politics alone and wind the women up because men are baffled as to what their role is now

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