Everybody – Unraveling the Anthem of Inclusivity and Identity


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Logic's Everybody at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. Hollywood or Reality? Dissecting Societal Facades
  5. Through the Eyes of Little Bobby: Childhood and Racial Identity
  6. The Heartbeat of the Chorus: Universal Connection in ‘Everybody’
  7. Unveiling the Hidden Meaning: Logic’s Commentary on Intersectionality
  8. ‘Everybody’ Knows These Lines: The Memorable Quips That Resonate

Lyrics

Okay I was gone for a minute but I’m back now
Sit the fuck back down
Seem like everybody nowadays Hollywood
Oh it’s like that now?
I’ma show you mothafuckas how to act now
I’ma show ’em how to act
I’ma show you, show you, show you, show you
I’ma show ’em how to act

Okay now picture little Bobby just a youngin’ runnin’ ’round
With his mans, hammer in his hands, feelin’ like the man
Run, mothafucka, run
‘Fore the popo get the gun, put it to your brain like goddamn!
Everybody know you ain’t about it
Everything you talk about I know I can live without it
Red light, stop, green light, go!
Everything ain’t what it seem like
Mothafucka I know!
Hold up, what you mean, where you been?
Bitch I been in
This is merely the beginning again
What you been living in?
A box, under the bridge, like Anthony Kiedis?
Looking for something to complete us
And maybe lead us, fuck an elitist
Hell of a long way from equal is how they treat us
Body of a builder with the mind of a fetus
Turn on the television and see the vision they feed us
And I wish I could erase that, face facts

Everybody people, everybody bleed, everybody need something
Everybody love, everybody know, how it go
Everybody people, everybody bleed, everybody need something
Everybody love, everybody know

I been knockin’ doors down like a Jehovah witness
God as my witness, I’m with this
But on the real I think I need another witness!
If it was 1717, black daddy, white momma wouldn’t change a thing
Light skin mothafucka certified as a house nigga
Well I’ll be God damned, go figure
In my blood is the slave and the master
It’s like the devil playin’ spades with the pastor
But he was born with the white privilege!
Man what the fuck is that?
White people told me as a child, as a little boy, playin’ with his toys
I should be ashamed to be black
And some black people look ashamed when I rap
Like my great granddaddy didn’t take a whip to the back
Not accepted by the black or the white
I don’t give a fuck, praise God, I could see the light
Everybody talkin’ ’bout race this, race that
Wish I could erase that, face facts

Everybody people, everybody bleed, everybody need something
Everybody love, everybody know, how it go
Everybody people, everybody bleed, everybody need something
Everybody love, everybody know

Okay I was gone for a minute but I’m back now
Sit the fuck back down
Seem like everybody nowadays Hollywood
Oh it’s like that now?
I’ma show you mothafuckas how to act now
I’ma show ’em how to act
I’ma show you, show you, show you, show you
I’ma show ’em how to act

Full Lyrics

Logic’s ‘Everybody’ isn’t just a track; it’s an audacious statement etched into the annals of hip-hop, a genre that has long prided itself on the raw expression of the human condition. With a title seemingly simple and inclusive, the song delves into the complex layers of racial identity, societal expectations, and inner conflict.

The Maryland-born rapper, Sir Robert Bryson Hall II, better known by his stage name Logic, catapults listeners into a soundscape of hard-hitting beats and introspective lyrics that challenge the status quo and call for a recognition of our shared humanity. Let’s dissect the song’s potent message and uncover the hidden truths beneath its catchy chorus and aggressive verses.

Hollywood or Reality? Dissecting Societal Facades

Logic kicks off with a vehement chorus that dismisses the glamorized façade of Hollywood culture, employing it as a metaphor for the artificial fronts people put up. It’s punctuated by a call to authenticity, as Logic vows to show ‘mothafuckas how to act,’ perhaps alluding to a deeper sense of integrity that goes beyond the superficiality of fame.

The juxtaposition of Hollywood’s glitzy exterior against the song’s brutally honest core highlights a universal quest for truth amidst a world filled with illusion. Logic doesn’t just criticize the superficial; he invites listeners to join him in tearing down the pretense.

Through the Eyes of Little Bobby: Childhood and Racial Identity

Logic introduces ‘little Bobby,’ a youthful avatar illustrating his personal experiences with race and identity. The vivid imagery of a child with a ‘hammer in his hands’ is a stark depiction of the pressures young individuals of mixed heritage may face. Navigating racial dynamics can be as fraught as running from the authorities—an escape from preconceived notions that threaten to define one’s existence.

The powerful narrative confronts the societal labeling and the struggle to find one’s place in a dichotomized culture. Logic encapsulates the paradox of being too ‘black’ or too ‘white,’ neither fully accepted. It’s a tale of alienation but also resilience, encapsulating a powerful message against racial stereotyping.

The Heartbeat of the Chorus: Universal Connection in ‘Everybody’

The chorus of ‘Everybody’ acts as a heartbeat within the track, a rhythmic reminder that despite our differences, we are bound by common threads. The repetitious lines, ‘Everybody people, everybody bleed, everybody need something, everybody love, everybody know,’ speak to the fundamental needs and experiences that connect all humans.

In these catchy and powerful lines, Logic transcends personal narrative to address a collective understanding – for all the ways we distinguish ourselves, there are elemental truths to human existence that create an undeniable bond.

Unveiling the Hidden Meaning: Logic’s Commentary on Intersectionality

Beyond its confrontation with external perceptions of race, ‘Everybody’ dives into the philosophy of intersectionality, where race, identity, and privilege collide. Logic exposes his own lineage as containing the ‘slave and the master,’ a duality that presents an almost inescapable conflict within the self.

This profound revelation underscores the complexity of identity that is rarely addressed in mainstream music. Logic becomes a voice for those who are often forced to grapple with their mixed heritage in a world obsessed with categorical definitions.

‘Everybody’ Knows These Lines: The Memorable Quips That Resonate

A master of memorable lines, Logic delivers quips that resonate long after the song ends. When he reflects, ‘Wish I could erase that, face facts,’ the irony is palpable—while he yearns to remove the stains of prejudice, he knows that confronting these uncomfortable truths is the only path to progress.

Moreover, the line ‘If it was 1717, black daddy, white momma wouldn’t change a thing,’ encapsulates the absurdity and persistence of racial discrimination. Logic’s candid lyrics serve as bitter reminders of history’s scars while simultaneously providing anthemic chants for a more enlightened and inclusive future.

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