Hazey – Unpacking the Psychedelic Labyrinth of Emotions


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Glass Animals's Hazey at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. The Spiral of Addiction and Its Chains
  5. Racing Against Oneself: The Internal Struggle
  6. Through the Glass: Decoding the Hidden Meaning
  7. Face to Face with the Facade: The Smiling Mask
  8. The Dialectic Dance: Push, Pull, and Provocation

Lyrics

Your baby’s falling
You know I’m talking now
You know I’m dancing
You know I’m racing ’round

No, no you’re so juiced
You said you’d kick the booze
You know I’ll get bruised
You know I’m just a boy

Come back, baby, don’t you cry
Don’t you drain those big blue eyes
I’ve been crawling
Come back, baby, don’t you cry
Just you say the reason why
I can calm you

You say I’m bawling
I say I’m begging while
You take my photo
I fake my breaking smile
I’m fucking loco
I can’t get through to you
You turn your nose, you
Spark up and I can go

Come back, baby, don’t you cry
Don’t you drain those big blue eyes
I’ve been crawling
Come back, baby, don’t you cry
Just you say the reason why
I can calm you

Full Lyrics

Glass Animals’ ‘Hazey’ is more than just a sonic escapade into the world of psychedelic pop; it’s a lyrical tapestry woven with threads of raw emotion, dependency, and the chaos of relationships. While the chillwave beats might incline one to simply nod along, the depth of the lyrics calls for a profound dive into the essence of the human condition as reflected by the band.

Released on their 2014 debut album ‘ZABA’, ‘Hazey’ offers a blend of hypnotic rhythms and cryptic lyrics that have enthralled fans and critics alike. But what underpins this track is a rich subtext that speaks to the complexities of intimacy, addiction, and the need for connection.

The Spiral of Addiction and Its Chains

At first glance, the repeated appeals of ‘come back, baby, don’t you cry’ masquerade as a simple plea. However, delving deeper into the context and the recurring motifs, it becomes evident that ‘Hazey’ portrays the visceral grip of addiction. ‘You said you’d kick the booze’, the song nudges at the promises made in the eye of dependency, promises that often wither in the relentless cycle of substance abuse.

The ‘big blue eyes’ symbolize an innocence or naivety that the subject wishes to preserve but simultaneously depletes with their actions. This dichotomy is the human wrestling match between desire for change and the ensnaring comfort of habits.

Racing Against Oneself: The Internal Struggle

The song’s hypnotic repetition mirrors the cyclical nature of self-conflict. As one line races to the next with ‘You know I’m dancing, you know I’m racing ’round’, it mirrors an internal chaos. It reflects a protagonist who is caught in a whirlwind of emotions, trying to convince, console, and cajole his way to stability.

Glass Animals perfectly encapsulate the frenetic mental scramble to maintain control over one’s life while the foundation crumbles—a poignant portrait of the human condition not often conveyed with such sonic subtlety.

Through the Glass: Decoding the Hidden Meaning

Under the velvety layer of ‘Hazey’s’ rhythm lies a narrative rich with psychological complexity. The lyrics, when stripped back, suggest an allegory for the battle between the duality of self—the present, conflicted self and the ideal, sober self.

The repeated entreaty to come back, paired with the line ‘I can calm you’, speaks volumes about the human desire not just for external solace but for an inner peace that is often elusive when grappling with one’s demons.

Face to Face with the Facade: The Smiling Mask

‘I fake my breaking smile’ is one of the song’s most revealing lines, laying bare the universal tendency to mask our internal fractures with a facade of composure. It sheds light on the performative aspects of coping, where the subject wrestles with their authenticity while trying to present a veneer of normality to the world.

This line underscores the dissonance between what we show to the world and our true feelings, a poignant remark on the disconnection from the self that often accompanies the struggle with addiction or emotional turmoil.

The Dialectic Dance: Push, Pull, and Provocation

The track’s back-and-forth is an immersive representation of a dialectic relationship, where the roles of enabler and enabled become blurred. ‘You know I’ll get bruised’ might not just signify a physical scarring, but the emotional and mental toll exerted on both parties.

The push-and-pull dynamic embodied in the lyrics paints a vivid portrait of relationships marred by addiction and the emotional hazards associated with co-dependency. It’s an unflinching observation of love’s more challenging facets, entangled with human frailties.

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