Natural Blues – Unveiling The Soulful Cry Behind The Rhythmic Pulse


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Moby's Natural Blues at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. The Cry for Understanding in a Turbulent World
  5. A Journey Through Joy and Tragedy Under a Microscope
  6. Unearthing the Song’s Hidden Baptismal Imagery
  7. ‘Don’t Nobody Know My Troubles but God’: A Lament That Resonates Across Time
  8. The Timeless Quality of Moby’s Electro-Spiritual Fusion

Lyrics

Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God

Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God

Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God

Went down the hill, the other day
Soul got happy and stayed all day

Went down the hill, the other day
Soul got happy and stayed all day

Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God

Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God

Went in the room, didn’t stay long
Looked on the bed and brother was dead

Went in the room, didn’t stay long
Looked on the bed and brother was dead

Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God

Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God

Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God

Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God

Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God
Don’t nobody know my troubles but God

Full Lyrics

Moby’s ‘Natural Blues’ reverberates as a plaintive cry wrapped in an electronic symphony, a startling juxtaposition of old and new that forms the backbone of his album ‘Play’. At first listen, the track is a gripping medley of haunting vocals and a pulsating beat. However, beneath the layers of its entrancing rhythm lies a narrative of sorrow and spiritual introspection.

The song builds its home on the samples of Vera Hall’s ‘Trouble So Hard’, a work song of Southern American origin, and this foundation sets the backdrop for a deeper dive into both personal agony and the universal human struggle. As we peel back the layers, ‘Natural Blues’ becomes a window into the soul of not just one man, but echoes the tribulations faced by generations.

The Cry for Understanding in a Turbulent World

Moby’s masterful integration of Vera Hall’s anguished refrain ‘Oh Lordy, Lord, trouble so hard’ captures a universal yearning for understanding amidst adversity. It’s a cry out to an existence that is frequently cold and incomprehensible. These lines are the core from which the rest of the song’s poetry blooms, emphasizing the often solitary nature of suffering where comfort can only be sought in the divine.

The repetitive nature of the chorus is not merely a musical choice, but it underscores the cyclical nature of hardship. Life’s repeated knocks can make the search for solace a mantra, as if repetition itself can summon the empathy of a higher power — ‘Don’t nobody know my troubles but God’.

A Journey Through Joy and Tragedy Under a Microscope

The lyrics fleetingly mention moments of respite — ‘Went down the hill, the other day / Soul got happy and stayed all day’. This is the human condition: brief interludes of happiness that are just as quickly overshadowed by sorrow. Moby doesn’t dwell on these moments, rather, they serve as poignant reminders that joy is often transient.

In the stark contrast of the line ‘Looked on the bed and brother was dead’, Moby lays bare the abruptness of loss. The brevity of this stanza, a mere four lines, encapsulates the suddenness with which grief can enter our lives, stripping away the fluff and leaving us with the raw reality of our fleeting existence.

Unearthing the Song’s Hidden Baptismal Imagery

‘Natural Blues’ is not only a tale of woe but is infused with a certain baptismal quality. The act of going down the hill and the transformation it entails — the soul becoming happy — hints at a narrative of rebirth. In the face of suffering, there exists the possibility of renewal and the washing away of tribulations.

Yet, the religious overtones remain laced with a somber reality. The respite is ephemeral, and the baptismal hope is not a promise of worldly relief but an acceptance of the burden of life and an acknowledgment of the spiritual journey that each individual must undertake alone.

‘Don’t Nobody Know My Troubles but God’: A Lament That Resonates Across Time

The standout line of ‘Natural Blues’, which Moby borrowed from Vera Hall’s spiritual lament, encapsulates the core sentiment of the song. It continues to resonate with listeners because it speaks to the isolation one feels amidst personal trials. The idea that only a divine entity can truly comprehend the depth of one’s pain is both comforting and sorrowful.

In each repetition of the phrase, there is a multitude of emotions: vulnerability, despair, resilience, and faith. This lyrical refrain has become synonymous with the song itself, etching its memory in the minds and hearts of those who find solace in its echo.

The Timeless Quality of Moby’s Electro-Spiritual Fusion

The ingenuity of ‘Natural Blues’ lies in how Moby bridges the gap between the traditional and the modern, creating an anthem that feels simultaneously timeless and fresh. The merging of century-old vocals with the electronic music palette of the time gives ‘Natural Blues’ a unique place in the musical landscape.

The song’s ability to touch the contemporary listener is a testament to the enduring nature of its message. It proves that human hardship, the pursuit of understanding, and the encounter with mortality are as relevant now as they were when Vera Hall first vocalized her spiritual trials. Moby has, in essence, crafted a modern hymn that continues to find new ears and hearts to comfort.

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