Next – A Cryptic Ballad of Fame and Love


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for The Weeknd's Next at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. Fame’s Lure: Dissecting The Weeknd’s Ode to Temporariness
  5. The Siren’s Call: Unraveling the Song’s Emotional Fabric
  6. Peering Behind the Velvet Curtain: The Song’s Hidden Meaning
  7. The Poetry of Pain: Memorable Lines that Haunt
  8. Reflections in a Shattered Mirror: Understanding Personal Narratives

Lyrics

Oh-oh, whoa, whoa-oh, whoa-oh

She pop that pussy on a Monday
She never falls in love
But she heard me in the club, she put in work
She wanna give me all her money
She used to spend it all alone
‘Cause her man went and did her wrong, so she

But baby I’m not trying to be the one
I got my baby waiting home
She been too good to let that go
And I ain’t tryna win your heart
And you can’t pay to win my love
So keep dancin’, baby, keep dancin’, dancin’
Keep dancin’, dancin’, keep dancin’

(I want you)
I know, yes I know, yes I know, yes I know, yes I know
(Baby, I want you)
I’m too far in this game, to let go
So let go, so let go
(Baby, I want you)

Baby, who you tryna fool?
Girl, I might be twenty-one but I got memories to prove
That I’ve seen your kind before
And I know exactly what you want

You just want me ’cause I’m next
You just want me ’cause I’m next, baby
You just want me ’cause I’m next
You just want me ’cause I’m next

You just want me ’cause I’m next, baby
You just want me ’cause I’m next
You just want me ’cause I’m next
You just want me ’cause I’m next, ooh yeah

You just want me ’cause I’m next
You just want me ’cause I’m next
You just want me ’cause I’m next, oh-oh

Ooh, ooh, ooh
Baby, who you callin’ soft?
Don’t make me smoke up all your kush
Don’t make me pop your cheap ass pills
I used to do this for the thrill, ooh yeah
I know you got a lot to lose
But ain’t nobody here but me

So, baby, what you got to prove, ooh yeah
I see the way your body moves
On the pole, on the floor, you’re alone (na-na-na-na)
But there ain’t nothing I can do
So keep dancin’ baby, keep dancin’, dancin’
Keep dancin’, dancin’, keep dancin’

(I want you)
I know, yes I know, yes I know, yes I know, yes I know
(Baby, I want you)
I’m too far in this game, to let go
So let go, so let go
(Baby, I want you)

Baby, who you tryna fool?
Girl, I might be twenty-one but I got memories to prove
That I’ve seen your kind before
And I know exactly what you want, oh

You just want me ’cause I’m next
You just want me ’cause I’m next
You just want me ’cause I’m next
You just want me ’cause I’m next

You just want me ’cause I’m next
You just want me ’cause I’m next
You just want me ’cause I’m next
You just want me ’cause I’m next

You just want me ’cause I’m next
You just want me ’cause I’m next
You just want me ’cause I’m next, oh

Ooh, ooh, ooh, ooh
Whoa
Ooh yeah, ooh yeah, ooh yeah, ooh yeah
Ooh yeah, ooh yeah, ooh yeah, ooh yeah

Full Lyrics

In the echelons of modern R&B and genre-mixing soundscapes, The Weeknd stands as a towering figure, his voice etching into the collective consciousness of pop culture. His song ‘Next’ is a mosaic of seduction, temporal desires, and the inescapability of true affection where others seek attachment to a rising star.

On the surface, ‘Next’ reads as a hedonistic tribute to the fast life, but beneath the pulsating beats and velvety vocals lies a darker, more poignant tale of love, fame, and genuine connection poised a hairsbreadth away from the superficial.

Fame’s Lure: Dissecting The Weeknd’s Ode to Temporariness

Throughout ‘Next’, The Weeknd crafts an anthem for ephemeral relationships, reflecting on the transient nature of connections formed under the spotlight. The narrative is of an individual acutely aware of the motives others bring to their fleeting engagements with him.

The protagonist addresses an unnamed subject, portraying her as someone allured by his status rather than his person. His repeated line, ‘You just want me ’cause I’m next’, becomes a haunting refrain that underscores the disposability he feels in these interactions.

The Siren’s Call: Unraveling the Song’s Emotional Fabric

There’s an element of tragedy woven into the lively rhythms of ‘Next’. The object of The Weeknd’s attention is depicted as energetic and liberated, yet there’s an undercurrent of sadness in the notion that her affection is merely a product of his fame.

This duality highlights a deeper connectivity crisis in modern romance, where image and prestige often overshadow genuine personal connection. The Weeknd sings not just of his own experience, but of a cultural pattern of seeking out ‘what’s next’ rather than ‘what’s real’.

Peering Behind the Velvet Curtain: The Song’s Hidden Meaning

The Weeknd isn’t just relaying a personal story; he’s offering commentary on the nature of stardom. ‘Next’ serves as a parable for the artist’s navigation through the seductions of fame and the yearning for a love untouched by it.

It is a looking glass into the soul of a performer who is at once desired for the myth he represents and painfully aware of the hollowness that can accompany such adoration. This realization is both his armor and his curse.

The Poetry of Pain: Memorable Lines that Haunt

‘She pop that pussy on a Monday / She never falls in love’ – these opening lyrics set the stage for the saga between hedonism and the search for something more profound. It’s as though The Weeknd is reaching through the song, attempting to find not just a body to satiate desires, but a heart to meet his own.

Echoing throughout the song, phrases like ‘She wanna give me all her money’ paint a portrait of a world where physical intimacy and financial gain are given and taken in the absence of emotional truth, etching the track into the listeners’ minds.

Reflections in a Shattered Mirror: Understanding Personal Narratives

What makes ‘Next’ resonate with listeners is The Weeknd’s ability to mirror their own experiences. Many have felt the sting of superficial relationships—of being wanted for what one represents rather than who one is.

‘Baby, who you tryna fool?’ This rhetorical question poses a dense reflection of situations where self-deception runs rampant, and the gulf between the authentic self and the persona crafted for public consumption becomes ever wider.

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