“Waiting on a War” by Foo Fighters

The title of this song (“Waiting on a War”) and its overall theme speaks to the notion of the prospect of nuclear war being one that has been present for a few decades now. The backstory is that when the Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl was but a lad, he was so during one of the peaks of the Cold War. During that time, many people, including himself, lived with the fear that the nuclear superpowers would actually go at it. Then, as recently as 2020, his own daughter expressed a similar concern, which immediately prompted him to write this song. 

And ultimately, whereas the lyrics indeed conclude with the singer still “waiting on a war”, what it is actually meant to symbolize is the band’s associated belief that ‘every child deserves a future’.

Facts about “Waiting on a War”

The composition of this song is credited to the entire Food Fighters’ crew, with Dave Grohl being the one who conceptualized it. And he was inspired to do so via a conversation he had with his pre-teen daughter.

The producer of this track is the well-traveled Greg Kurstin.

This track is from the Foo Fighters’ project entitled “Medicine at Midnight”, a collaborative effort between music companies RCA Records and Roswell Records. And the song came out on the date of 14 January 2021.

Did Foo Fighters release “Waiting for a War” as a single?

Yes. It was actually the third single that the band brought out from their “Medicine at Night” album. “Shame Shame” was the album’s first single. The second was “No Son of Mine“.

8 Responses

  1. Anonymous says:

    Love the song -actually got a little emotional listening to it

    • Cait says:

      Same. It makes me super emotional for some reason. I feel that way about a lot of Foo songs.

    • Chris Walsh says:

      Yup
      There is something about the way Dave uses and picks chords for his songs.
      They transmit emotions
      Probably the only active mainstream rocker that does that

  2. ophio says:

    I agree with the above commenters. It takes you back to your own days of youth, but our toy guns were practicing WWII tactics as Vietnam images were often hidden from the kids. Great song by an incredibly talented band!

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