Want To – Unraveling The Anthem of Autonomy and Release


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Dua Lipa's Want To at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. Empowerment and It’s Beat: Dua Lipa’s Battle Cry
  5. Unpacking the Mantra: ‘It’s My Body, I’ll Dance If I Want To’
  6. Dimming the Noise: Dua Lipa’s Brush with Expectations and Gossip
  7. The Hidden Meaning: Seeking Release Over Restraint
  8. A Dancefloor Rebellion: No Heart, No Second Degree

Lyrics

I’m young for tonight, it’s all under my control
I won’t hesitate, it’s my turn to make that call
I just want a touch, I ain’t here for love no more
Okay, yeah

I won’t stop, not now
Guess what?
Hey-la, hey-la, it’s my body right
I glow in light
Hey-la, hey-la, it’s my body
I’ll dance if I want to

Hey-la, hey-la, it’s my body
Hey-la, hey-la, it’s my body

Some people do
But some, they just like to talk (okay)
Some shoot the breeze
But some like to leave a mark (okay)
Some need the light
And some people like the dark (okay, yeah)

I won’t stop, not now
Guess what?
Hey-la, hey-la, it’s my body right
I glow in light
Hey-la, hey-la, it’s my body
I’ll dance if I want to

Hey-la, hey-la, it’s my body
Hey-la, hey-la, it’s my body

Gimme release
Keep the drugs, gimme relief
Keep the love, just gimme a piece of that
One piece of that
Give it to me
Don’t blush, just give it to me
No heart, no second degree tonight
Run free tonight
I’ll dance if I want to

My body, my body, my body (hey-la, hey-la, it’s my body)
Hey-la, hey-la, it’s my body
My body, my body, my body
Hey-la, hey-la, it’s my body
Gonna dance if I want to, want to
Gonna dance if I want to, want to (hey-la, hey-la, it’s my body)

Full Lyrics

Dua Lipa’s track ‘Want To’ is not just a slick, electro-pop banger that’s bound to get you moving, it’s a declarative statement of self-autonomy and the liberating feeling of being in control of one’s own body and choices. At its core, it’s a celebration of the youthful spirit that yearns to shake off expectations and revel in the moment.

Through an infectious hook and unabashed lyrics, Lipa crafts a narrative that challenges the listener to consign to oblivion societal notions and to embrace personal desires. The song is a resonant reflection of contemporary empowerment themes, encased within the vibrant rhythms that have come to define Dua Lipa’s signature sound.

Empowerment and It’s Beat: Dua Lipa’s Battle Cry

At the heart of ‘Want To’ lies an energetic beat that serves as the very pulse of autonomy the song portrays. The music’s very essence encapsulates a forceful sentiment, empowering listeners to take ownership of their actions and freedoms. Lipa’s commanding voice serves as a rallying cry, encapsulating the desire to live unrestrained by the judgments of others.

It’s not just about the right to move freely on the dance floor. The beat reverberates with larger implications about body autonomy and agency. In today’s societal landscape, where conversations around these topics are more prevalent than ever, ‘Want To’ hits a personal chord with many, serving as an anthem for personal liberation.

Unpacking the Mantra: ‘It’s My Body, I’ll Dance If I Want To’

‘It’s my body, I’ll dance if I want to’—this simple yet potent line is repeated like a mantra throughout ‘Want To’. It transcends being mere lyrics of a pop song and transforms into a bold statement on personal freedom. Dua Lipa uses this refrain to reinforce the song’s fundamental message: the unapologetic celebration of one’s agency over one’s body.

By repeating the phrase like a beat-driven pulse, Lipa creates a hypnotic aura that underscores her insistence on autonomy. It’s a memorable line that doesn’t just stick in the mind because of its catchiness, but because it strikes at the heart of a deeply resonant issue—the right of individuals to choose for themselves without external pressures.

Dimming the Noise: Dua Lipa’s Brush with Expectations and Gossip

Delve into the lyrics of ‘Want To’, and you’ll find a nuanced brush with the gaze of society. As Lipa navigates the space of freedom and control, she brings into play the dichotomy of how people choose to interact with the world: ‘Some people do/But some, they just like to talk’. Tackling the theme of societal expectations and rumor-mongering, the song dismisses the idle talk in favor of leaving an indelible personal mark.

There is a distinct message here about the contrast between action and inaction, between those who do and those who merely speak. In choosing ‘to do’, Lipa aligns herself with a lineage of proactive decision-makers, thereby subtly commenting on the power of taking agency in one’s narrative, amidst the background noise of society.

The Hidden Meaning: Seeking Release Over Restraint

Beneath the formidable tempo of ‘Want To’ lies a deep-seated craving for release—a theme that might not be evident upon a cursory listen. ‘Gimme release/Keep the drugs, gimme relief’, Lipa calls out, distancing herself from artificial aids and emphasizing a need for authentic, self-derived liberation.

This craving for ‘release’ serves as a meta-commentary on the very essence of the party scene, often laden with artificial stimulants used to achieve a sense of freedom. However, Lipa dismantles this convention, elevating the natural adrenaline rush of dancing and self-expression above the need for external substances to feel the euphoria of living in the moment.

A Dancefloor Rebellion: No Heart, No Second Degree

The lyrics ‘No heart, no second degree tonight/Run free tonight’ summarize the song’s essence of unfettered self-expression. In these lines, Lipa draws a line in the sand, rebuffing emotional strings and the potential burn of deep attachments. It’s a night for the ephemeral, for the transient joy that comes from surrendering to the rhythm, disconnected from the weight of emotions or consequences.

‘Want To’ doesn’t just invoke the freedom to move; it embodies the freedom from the heavy entanglements that often accompany human interactions. By declaring a space free from sentimentality or the fear of getting hurt—a ‘second-degree’ burn—Dua Lipa carves out a sanctuary on the dancefloor, where one can engage with the music, detached from the vulnerability of deeper connections.

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