Tap In – Decoding the Anthem of Female Empowerment and Hustler’s Spirit


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Saweetie's Tap In at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. Self-Empowerment: The Heartbeat of ‘Tap In’
  5. Materialism and Relationships: A Daring Dichotomy
  6. The Hidden Meaning: Behind the Icy Exterior
  7. The Resilience in Memorable Lines
  8. Hyphy Revival: Honoring a Legacy

Lyrics

Don’t ever stop if you want to be on top, bitch

Lil’ waist, fat ass, bitch, tap in
Tap, tap, tap in
Diamonds dancin’ on your neck, nigga, tap in
Tap, tap, tap in
Fuck a nigga, get rich, bitch, tap in
Tap, tap, tap in
M-O-B, icy gang, nigga, tap in (hmm)
Tap, tap, tap in (ayy)

Wrist on glitter (ayy), waist on thinner (ayy)
I’ma show you how to bag a eight-figure nigga (hoo)
Face on my zaddy (sheesh), pockets on Jigga (hoo)
You better get the card and make it swipe like tinder (phew)
Private villa and the fur chinchilla (ha)
When he post me, all the hoes get sicker (blah)
Fuckboy killer, I don’t need fillers (nope)
Never been a lame so the real bitches feel it (yeah)
Daddy on the Facetime, you could never take mine
End up on the dateline, uh, uh, uh (bitch)
Rich with no day job, bitch, hit your wop, wop
Always on the court side, uh-huh, huh
B-b-billionaire niggas wanna eat me out (hahaha)
Bitch, I’m from the west coast, they wanna go down south
All these lame ass niggas tryna fuck for clout
Hmm, I won’t let him hit but he can put it in his mouth

Lil’ waist, fat ass, bitch, tap in
Tap, tap, tap in
Diamonds dancin’ on your neck, nigga, tap in
Tap, tap, tap in
Fuck a nigga, get rich, bitch, tap in
Tap, tap, tap in
M-O-B, icy gang, nigga, tap in (mm-hmm, yeah)
Tap, tap, tap in

You got a itty-bitty waist (huh?), pretty in the face (what?)
Never let a broke nigga take you on a date (nah)
Nah, haters can’t relate, bitch, I’ve never been fake (girl, bye)
I got a real nigga puttin’ icing on my cake (mwah)
Icy from my lips to my fingers to my toenails
Drippin’ in Chanay-nay, this ain’t goin’ on sale
All these hoes boosie, baby, I do not do friends well
Lotta niggas pussy, but I promised that I won’t tell
Hmm, now, what’s my favorite word? (Icy)
Bitch gon’ smile, but I know she don’t like me
Two hundred for a verse, bitch, I’m way too pricey
Fuck around and bring back hyphy

Lil’ waist, fat ass, bitch, tap in
Tap, tap, tap in
Diamonds dancin’ on your neck, nigga, tap in
Tap, tap, tap in
Fuck a nigga, get rich, bitch, tap in
Tap, tap, tap in
M-O-B, icy gang, nigga, tap in
Tap, tap, tap in

Full Lyrics

In a world where the soundscape of hip-hop is often dominated by braggadocio and materialistic prowess, Saweetie’s ‘Tap In’ ricochets as a bold anthem of self-assurance and female empowerment. With its hypnotic beat and catchphrase-ready hooks, the track presents more than just surface-level glitz; it’s a cultural cipher that demands listeners to decode its deeper messages.

As listeners, we engage with ‘Tap In’ not just as consumers of music, but as cultural participants witnessing Saweetie’s embodiment of confidence, financial independence, and boundary-breaking attitudes towards the roles of women in rap. This exploration aims to peel back the layers of ‘Tap In,’ weaving through its shimmering exterior and delving into the rich tapestry of meaning that Saweetie scribes into the very fabric of the four-count beat.

Self-Empowerment: The Heartbeat of ‘Tap In’

The pulsating command ‘Tap In’ isn’t merely a catchphrase; it’s a clarion call for self-empowerment and taking control of one’s narrative. Saweetie’s insistence on recognizing worth, as outlined by her ‘lil’ waist, fat ass’ and dripping diamonds, flips the script on objectification and reclaims the power of self-definition.

‘Tap In’ becomes an audacious dance of autonomy. Saweetie doesn’t wait for validation—she seizes it with both hands, metaphorically illustrated through flashy jewelry that is emblematic of success and independence, not of vanity or dependence on a male figure.

Materialism and Relationships: A Daring Dichotomy

The track is unabashed in its glorification of wealth, with Saweetie touting relationships tied to financial prosperity. She drops references to ‘eight-figure niggas’ and ‘pockets on Jigga,’ crafting an image of the ultimate power couple, jet-setting to ‘Private villa(s)’ and draped in ‘fur chinchilla(s)’.

However, far from a shallow materialistic mantra, ‘Tap In’ wields these symbols as tokens of the game of hustle, sharing the mantra that personal value and success are not to be diminished nor handed out, but earned and owned outright, especially in the context of women in the music industry.

The Hidden Meaning: Behind the Icy Exterior

Underneath the sheen of Saweetie’s ‘icy’ facade is a lattice of cultural commentary and social awareness. The ‘fuckboy killer’ and ‘never been a lame’ lines aren’t just barbed words; they’re statements of discernment and self-respect in the minefield of modern dating.

Saweetie layers the song with an understanding that the modern woman navigates a complex world where her value is often unjustly tied to physicality and attachment to men. ‘Tap In’ is a rejection of such archaic confines, encouraging listeners to ‘get the card and make it swipe’ with full agency.

The Resilience in Memorable Lines

The song’s sticky lyrics, like ‘haters can’t relate, bitch, I’ve never been fake,’ are more than hooks—they’re an armor against the negativity and doubters. They serve as affirmations that preserve self-identity and personal truth in the face of adversity.

These memorable lines become mantras that listeners can evoke to reinforce their own resilience. The themes resonate, providing a shared vocabulary for those striving in an often unforgiving and competitive environment.

Hyphy Revival: Honoring a Legacy

In a nod to her Californian roots, Saweetie harkens back to the hyphy movement with the line ‘Fuck around and bring back hyphy.’ This isn’t just a historical footnote; it’s a declaration of her commitment to keeping alive an energetic representation of West Coast culture through her music.

Her reference to this high-energy, Bay Area-born style speaks not only to Saweetie’s own geographical heritage but also to the resilient spirit of a regional subculture that morphed into a nationwide phenomenon, paying homage to the legacy that preceded her.

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