Favorite Song – Unraveling the Layers of Auditory Bliss


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Chance the Rapper's Favorite Song at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. A Symphony of Self-Expression: Chance’s Vocal Palette
  5. Dialogues in Duality: The Hidden Meaning in Collaboration
  6. Nostalgia Tripping: The ’92 Vibe and Its Significance
  7. ‘Bout that Jam’: An Anthem for the Misunderstood Masterpieces
  8. Echoes of Memorable Lines: A Cultural Salute

Lyrics

Chance, acid rapper, soccer, hacky sacker
Cocky khaki jacket jacker
Slap-happy faggot slapper, bah-nah
Iraqi rocket launcher
Shake that Laffy Taffy, jolly raunchy rapper
Dang, dang, dang, skeet, skeet, skeet
She do that thing for three retweets
The album feel like ’92
Now take that ball ‘fore he three-peat
Chance, ho, acid, cruising on that LSD
Asked Joseph about my deal
He looked back said, “Hell yeah, let’s eat!”

This shit my favorite song, you just don’t know the words
But I still fuck with you, you just ain’t never heard
It go like, count that stack, pop that cap then down that Jack
All my niggas hit that xan, and all my ladies ’bout that bag
This my jam, this my jam, this my jam, this my jam
I’m ’bout that jam, I’m ’bout that jam, I’m ’bout that jam, I’m ’bout that jam
This my jam, this my jam, this my jam, this my jam
I’m ’bout that jam, I’m ’bout that jam, I’m ’bout that jam, I’m bout that jam

Young Rascal Flatts, young ass kid ass could rap
Fuck all the faculty, tobacco-packing acrobat
Back-to-back packin’ bags back and forth with fifths of Jack
Fourths of weed, I’m back to pack on hands
With young Cletus to pat my back
Real nigga with a nose ring, that’s right
Just here to rap them songs
Rag on my hair wrap, weed in Vegas, rockin’ Vagabonds
Sang a song, oh you don’t know? What?
Well, I still bang with you
Hang with you, sip drank with you
As long as I can sang with you like

This shit my favorite song, you just don’t know the words
But I still fuck with you, you just ain’t never heard
It go like, count that stack, pop that cap then down that Jack
All my niggas hit that xan, and all my ladies ’bout that bag
This my jam, this my jam, this my jam, this my jam
I’m ’bout that jam, I’m ’bout that jam, I’m ’bout that jam, I’m ’bout that jam
This my jam, this my jam, this my jam, this my jam
I’m ’bout that jam, I’m ’bout that jam, I’m ’bout that jam, I’m bout that jam

Niggas please be focused, that ‘Bino, you know this
He rep the home of Sosas, you know I’m from that Zone 6
You know I rep that Stone shit, you know your ‘hood is so clit
As God as my witness, this Will Smith spit real shit
I’mma be that, CG busy gettin’, where the weed at?
Bought your girl some new kneepads
You’re fuckin’ with the Fifi bag
My stars, egad, she said, “This my favorite song”
“Hold my purse” now she on the floor, droppin’ like it’s hot
You blast this shit in Abercrombie when your work is finished
Your mom won’t play it in the car ’cause it’s got cursing in it
Your boy like, “I’m the one who showed you,” he want his percentage
‘Cause you were like: “This ain’t the nigga you said spittin’, is it?”
Two-step white dude’s Harlem Shake
Why you laughing?
‘Cause you Harlem Shake
I was never fake, I was just too good to be true
That’s acid rap, we killed the track
You had your chance, and ‘Bino too

This shit my favorite song, you just don’t know the words
But I still fuck with you, you just ain’t never heard
It go like, count that stack, pop that cap then down that Jack
All my niggas hit that xan, and all my ladies ’bout that bag
This my jam, this my jam, this my jam, this my jam
I’m ’bout that jam, I’m ’bout that jam, I’m ’bout that jam, I’m ’bout that jam
This my jam, this my jam, this my jam, this my jam
I’m ’bout that jam, I’m ’bout that jam, I’m ’bout that jam, I’m bout that jam

Full Lyrics

At first listen, ‘Favorite Song’ by Chance the Rapper, featuring Childish Gambino, sounds like a technicolor celebration of hip-hop and youthful exuberance. The track, peppered with nostalgic references and infectious choruses, serves as a touchstone for any listener who’s ever had an anthem of their own. But delve a little deeper, and you realize it’s not just about a catchy tune — it’s a rich tapestry that weaves together themes of authenticity, memory, and the complex relationship between artist and audience.

The song, which hails from Chance’s critically acclaimed mixtape ‘Acid Rap,’ uses playful language and rapid-fire verses to convey much more than the joy of a good beat. It’s a glimpse into the psyche of an artist at the crossroads of fame and integrity, wrestling with the influence and impact of his work.

A Symphony of Self-Expression: Chance’s Vocal Palette

Chance’s fluidity with words is on full display in ‘Favorite Song.’ His ability to jump from one identity to another — ‘acid rapper,’ ‘soccer,’ ‘hacky sacker’ — demonstrates a lyrical prowess that paints a picture of modern hip-hop’s multifaceted character. Through his dynamic wordplay, we see a celebration of individuality and the artistic freedom that comes with it.

A careful listen reveals the internal rhythm within the chaos. Chance meticulously layers verbal motifs and rhythms that do more than just sound good; they narrate a story of adaptation and survival in the music industry. As an independent artist, this track is his theater where every word is a deliberate stroke on the canvas of his career.

Dialogues in Duality: The Hidden Meaning in Collaboration

The song isn’t just a solo flight. It’s a duet of distinct personalities, with Childish Gambino (Donald Glover) offering his verse as a counterpoint to Chance’s musings. As Gambino delivers lines that are equally introspective and cocky, referencing his own place in the ‘home of Sosas,’ we’re treated to a conversation between two artists who are acutely aware of their origins and their skyrocketing trajectories.

This interaction underlines the track’s exploration of the fine line between confidence and arrogance. Each artist brings their unique experience to the track, creating a discourse that transcends a typical featuring arrangement. The hidden meaning here is one of partnership and authenticity, with both artists refusing to compromise in the face of mainstream pressures.

Nostalgia Tripping: The ’92 Vibe and Its Significance

Chance references the year 1992 not just as a timestamp but as an emotional anchor. For many, particularly in the hip-hop community, the early ’90s represent a golden era for the genre, a time of raw storytelling and cultural shaping. The acknowledgment of this era serves to align Chance’s work with the legacies of those who laid the groundwork for contemporary hip-hop.

Moreover, it’s an ode to the days before algorithms dominated what we listen to, when discovering a ‘favorite song’ was a more personal, serendipitous affair. In an age of streaming and playlists curated by machines, Chance yearns for the organic connection between music and memory, urging listeners to dig deeper than the surface.

‘Bout that Jam’: An Anthem for the Misunderstood Masterpieces

Common throughout the song is the assertion, ‘This shit my favorite song, you just don’t know the words.’ It’s a defiant stand against the idea that only widely understood or popular music can be meaningful. Chance positions his art as an anthem for those who appreciate the beauty in the overlooked or the misinterpreted.

This is also a nod to the experience many artists have of their deeper cuts — tracks that might not have mainstream appeal but hold a special place in the hearts of true fans. Chance magnifies the intimate connection that forms when art hits a specific nerve, regardless of its commercial success.

Echoes of Memorable Lines: A Cultural Salute

Throughout ‘Favorite Song,’ Chance the Rapper and Childish Gambino drop memorable one-liners that reverberate beyond the confines of the-track. From Gambino’s sharp ‘This Will Smith spit real shit’ to Chance’s playful ‘shake that Laffy Taffy, jolly raunchy rapper,’ we are given a lexicon that sticks with us, staking its claim in the ever-evolving dialect of hip-hop culture.

These lines are not just catchy; they serve as a salute to the culture from which both artists emerge. They map a linguistic journey through the heritage of black entertainment, from sitcom references to nods to candy-inspired Southern rap dances. It’s as much an exercise in honoring forebears as it is in establishing their place in the lineage of rap’s greats.

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