Same Drugs – Nostalgia, Change, and the Perils of Growing Up


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Chance the Rapper's Same Drugs at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. The Complexity of ‘Same Drugs’: Beyond the Obvious
  5. Wendy’s Transformation: A Symbol of Innocence Lost
  6. Peeling Back the Layers: The Song’s Hidden Meaning
  7. Nostalgia and Its Bittersweet Grip: Memorable Lines Explored
  8. Stay in the Line, Dandelion: The Poignancy of Holding On

Lyrics

We don’t do the same drugs no more
We don’t do the, we don’t do the same drugs, do the same drugs no more
Cause she don’t do the same drugs no more
We don’t do the, we don’t do the same drugs, do the same drugs no more

When did you change?
Wendy you’ve aged
I thought you’d never grow up
I thought you’d never
Window closed, Wendy got old
I was too late, I was too late
A shadow of what I once was

Cause we don’t do the same drugs no more
We don’t do the, we don’t do the same drugs, do the same drugs no more
She don’t laugh the same way no more
We don’t do the, we don’t do the same drugs, do the same drugs no more

Where did you go?
Why would you stay?
You must have lost your marbles
You always were so forgetful
In a hurry, don’t wait up
I was too late, I was too late
A shadow of what I once was
Cause we don’t, we don’t do what we say we’re gonna
You were always perfect, and I was only practice
Don’t you miss the days, stranger?
Don’t you miss the days?
Don’t you miss the danger?

We don’t (we don’t) do the same drugs no more (do the same drugs no more)
We don’t do the, we don’t do the same drugs, do the same drugs no more
We don’t (we don’t) do the same drugs no more (do the same drugs no more)
We don’t do the, we don’t do the same drugs, do the same drugs no more
We don’t do the, we don’t do the same drugs

(Turn it around
I remember when
This age of pathetics)
Don’t forget the happy thoughts
All you need is happy thoughts
The past tense, past bed time
Way back then when everything we read was real
And everything we said rhymed
Wide eyed kids being kids
When did you stop?
What did you do to your hair?
Where did you go to end up right back here?
When did you start to forget how to fly?
(This shit, wanna chew
Tastes like Juicy Fruit
Words have magnitude
Please get me out of that)
Don’t you color out
Don’t you bleed out, oh
Stay in the line, stay in the line
Dandelion
(Do the same drugs no more
We don’t do the, we don’t do the same drugs, do the same drugs no more
We don’t, we don’t, we don’t)
Don’t you color out
Don’t you bleed out, oh
Stay in the line, stay in the line
Dandelion

Full Lyrics

In the pantheon of modern hip-hop anthems, Chance the Rapper’s ‘Same Drugs’ strikes an emotional chord unlike any other. With its delicate piano melody and hauntingly reflective lyrics, the song is more than a surface-level ballad—it’s a deep dive into the fickleness of growth and the shared experiences that dissipate with time.

The track, a standout from Chance’s critically acclaimed ‘Coloring Book,’ is as poetic as it is enigmatic. A surface reading might leave one pondering its relation to substance abuse but a closer look reveals layers of meaning that resonate with any listener who has experienced the inevitable drifting apart that comes with maturation.

The Complexity of ‘Same Drugs’: Beyond the Obvious

At first listen, ‘Same Drugs’ may seem to lament the diverging paths taken by friends, once united by their revelries. However, Chance weaves a tapestry rich with metaphors, using the phrase ‘same drugs’ as a motif for common experiences and shared moments that no longer bond. The song is a poignant narrative on the evolution of relationships—how two people growing up can grow apart, not necessarily because of substances, but due to changes in perspectives, dreams, and identities.

Chance masterfully uses the metaphor to highlight these emotional distances that are as difficult to navigate as any tangential path. As the song progresses, it becomes clear that the ‘drugs’ represent not only a shared history but the lost innocence and sense of wonder from childhood, now replaced with adult cynicism and realities.

Wendy’s Transformation: A Symbol of Innocence Lost

The figure of ‘Wendy’ in ‘Same Drugs’ serves as a powerful symbol. Chance references Wendy Darling from Peter Pan, drawing parallels between the character known for her flight to Neverland and the unavoidable descent into adulthood. The line ‘Wendy you’ve aged’ signifies the stark reality of aging and the loss of innocence, positioning Wendy as the every-youth, now succumbing to the sands of time.

Her metamorphosis signifies the universal journey of growing up and the melancholy that accompanies watching a loved one traverse that same journey, away from the halcyon days of ‘happy thoughts’ and the freedom of youth symbolized by flight.

Peeling Back the Layers: The Song’s Hidden Meaning

Chance’s genius lies in his ability to hide depth within seemingly simple lyrics. ‘Same Drugs’ is less about the drugs themselves and more about the experiences and emotions attached to them. The repetition of ‘we don’t’ becomes a haunting echo of disconnection, emphasizing how shared experiences can fracture and change as people grow and their worlds expand in different directions.

The song poses reflective questions about personal growth and the nature of relationships that have drifted apart due to time and life choices. It’s a meditation on the personal evolution, the pain of realizing that you no longer know someone you were once close to, and the loneliness that can accompany self-growth.

Nostalgia and Its Bittersweet Grip: Memorable Lines Explored

The art of reminiscence plays a significant role in the song’s storytelling. Phrases like ‘Don’t you miss the days, stranger?’ and ‘Don’t you miss the danger?’ evoke a sense of lost youth, hinting at a past marked by shared risks and naïveté. Chance’s reflective questions are directed at both Wendy and the listener, inviting us to confront our own past and the relationships altered by time’s relentless march.

‘Don’t forget the happy thoughts’ is a command that stands out, alluding to the idea of holding onto the joyous memories as a means of coping with the present. It underscores the inevitability of change and the effort it takes to retain a connection to what once was, even if only in memory.

Stay in the Line, Dandelion: The Poignancy of Holding On

Throughout ‘Same Drugs’, Chance the Rapper toys with the imagery of childhood and its fleeting nature. The references to coloring outside the lines and the plea to stay within them reflect the longing for structure in the chaos that growing up entails. ‘Dandelion’—a flower known for its ephemeral beauty and association with wishes—encapsulates this yearning for simpler times.

As the song closes, the repetition of warnings against coloring and bleeding out can be seen as a struggle against the forces that pull us away from our truest selves. It’s a final plea for connection and recognition in a world that continuously evolves, taking pieces of our shared histories with it.

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