Good Ass Intro – Peeling Back the Layers of Self-Reflection and Hip-Hop Culture


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Chance the Rapper's Good Ass Intro at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. A Symphony of Success: The Victory Lap in Verse
  5. From Anxiety to Euphoria: The Drugs Metaphor Unveiled
  6. The Fast Life and Its Glittering Traps: Materialism in the Spotlight
  7. Lyrical Gymnastics Meet Philosophical Depth: The Art of Wordplay
  8. Uncovering the Song’s Hidden Heart: The Pulse of Connection

Lyrics

Even better than I was the last time baby
Oh oh oh oh ooh
Yo we back
I’m good, so good
And we back and we back

Raps just make me anxious and acid made me crazy
Them squares just made me looser and that wax just made me lazy
And I still make this song, and I’mma make another
If you ever actually hit me, better watch out for my brother
Better bet I’d take that deal, gotta watch out for my mother
Get a watch with all that glitters, come in clutters, different colors
Ben A Baller, Benford, butlers, chauffeurs, hit a stain-er, did I stutter?
Did a ton of drugs and did better than all my Alma mater
Motherfucker money dance, hundreds zan, gallon lean
Make a joke bout Leno’s hair then piggy back on Fallon’s spleen
Balancing on sporadicity and fucking pure joy
Nightly searches for a bed and I just came off tour with Troy
But I can’t complain I got some motherfucking business
How many lab partners have I fucked since I got suspended?
Mr. Bennett, you done did it, you did it, you did it
You did a good ass job, you did a good ass job
And I’m good

Even better than I was the last time baby
I’m good, so good

Work, work, work, work, bang nigga, bang
Twerk, twerk, merge, swerve, dang, pick a lane
Flip a bird, pigeon, plane, it’s a word, it’s a shame
But God I’m good, swear I couldn’t be better
Kicking dirt on the shirts of the lames
Keep a tab on my exes, keep some “x” on my tongue
Keep my work out in Texas, that’s just me flexing my lungs
See them showing they teeth, that’s just them flapping they gums
If they bite and I’m snapping clap clap collapsing they lungs
Call me Chancellor The Rapper, please say “The Rapper”
Magical word (poof), please say ‘Kadabra
Replay the replays, Green Bay, the Packers
Cremate your teammates and freebase the ashes
Matches to gas leaks, dusted dusk till dawn
It’s just us, and trust ya bottom bitch, might stuff the fucking bong
I’m the motherfucking fucker, fuck a niggas fucking dumb
This your favorite fucking album and ain’t even fucking done

Even better than I was the last time baby
Oh oh oh oh ooh
I’m good, so good

Full Lyrics

In the pantheon of modern hip-hop anthems, Chance the Rapper’s ‘Good Ass Intro’ commands a special place—a vibrant prelude to his acclaimed mixtape, ‘Acid Rap.’ It’s more than a mere opening track; it’s a manifesto, a bold declaration of arrival not just to the music scene but to a state of personal enlightenment. Wrapped in soulful horns and ebullient choirs, the Chicago native’s lyrics dance between playful wordplay and profound introspection.

Chance’s linguistic virtuosity serves as both a narrative and a mirror of his life’s journey—an odyssey marked by trials, tribulations, and triumphs. As we decode each line, we uncover the relentless spirit of an artist who is unafraid to lay bare his vulnerabilities while celebrating his ascent. Dive into the introspective opus and explore the cacophony of themes that ripple through ‘Good Ass Intro.’

A Symphony of Success: The Victory Lap in Verse

At its core, ‘Good Ass Intro’ resonates as Chance’s victory lap, a buoyant celebration of his personal and artistic growth. The opening lyrics, ‘Even better than I was the last time baby,’ serve as both a reminder and a proclamation that the artist has evolved, both through his hardships and his creative endeavors. It’s a recurring affirmation that underscores the entire track, a nod to the positive trajectory of his life and craft.

Embedded within this expression is a nuanced layer of self-acknowledgment. Chance is not just claiming improvement but reveling in the continuity of it—the ‘last time’ suggesting an ongoing journey rather than a finite goal. His repetition of ‘I’m good, so good’ is less about complacency and more about recognizing a state of peace amidst the ebbs and flows of a turbulent industry and personal history.

From Anxiety to Euphoria: The Drugs Metaphor Unveiled

What might initially read like a casual nod to recreational drug use spirals into a metaphor for the rapper’s escapades and their impact. In the candid line, ‘Raps just make me anxious and acid made me crazy,’ Chance touches on the pressures of the creative process and how his experiences with substances symbolically mirror his wrestles with life and artistry. The different substances mentioned correspond to various states of mind, as he fights to maintain his creative integrity while navigating the haze of fame and expectation.

Chance illustrates his resilient response despite the physiological and psychological tumult caused by these metaphorical ‘drugs.’ His resolve in lines such as ‘And I still make this song, and I’mma make another’ signals his determination to persevere through the madness and maintain his productive output against all odds. It’s a testament to the tenacity required to carve out one’s niche in the unpredictable world of music.

The Fast Life and Its Glittering Traps: Materialism in the Spotlight

Delving into the seductive glitter of material success, Chance paints a scene replete with the spoils of newfound wealth: ‘Get a watch with all that glitters, come in clutters, different colors.’ Yet beneath the bling lies a cautionary tale about the all-consuming nature of fame and the duplicity of its allure. The artist remains wary of its pitfalls—’motherfucker money dance, hundreds zan, gallon lean’—calling into question the very nature of wealth and whether it gratifies beyond the surface shimmer.

The magnetic pull of this lifestyle is contrasted with his familial commitments (caring for his mother and brother) and his community roots—a cornerstone of the rapper’s identity. By juxtaposing the material with the moral, ‘Good Ass Intro’ becomes a reflective assessment of the costs and rewards that accompany Chance’s journey in the limelight.

Lyrical Gymnastics Meet Philosophical Depth: The Art of Wordplay

One cannot help but marvel at the verbal dexterity exhibited in the track. Chance the Rapper’s wordplay is as much about rhythm and rhyme as it is about conveying his layered experiences. Lines like ‘Flipping bird, pigeon, plane, it’s a word, it’s a shame’ showcase an acrobatic use of language that transforms the mundane into the musical. It’s a cleverness that serves to engage as it enlightens, inviting listeners to parse through each phrase for hidden witticisms and deeper meanings.

The constant pivoting from humor to earnestness, from cultural commentary to personal revelation, is orchestrated with such finesse that each listen peels back another layer of the song’s core. This lyrical dynamism is Chance’s signature, allowing him to oscillate between the roles of the jester and the philosopher without losing the pulse of his overarching message.

Uncovering the Song’s Hidden Heart: The Pulse of Connection

Beneath the bravado and the beats, there’s an intimate core to ‘Good Ass Intro’ that chronicles Chance’s yearning for genuine connection. When he queries, ‘How many lab partners have I fucked since I got suspended?’ he’s not just riffing on his academic misadventures, but also reflecting on the transitory nature of relationships in an era of fleeting interactions. This poignancy traverses the entire track, culminating in an appreciative nod to his supporters: ‘This your favorite fucking album and ain’t even fucking done.’

Chance recognizes his music as a bridge between his world and that of his audience, creating a shared vibrational space where his triumphs and tribulations become communal. ‘Good Ass Intro’ thus emerges as a beacon of solidarity to every listener who has stood by him through thick and thin, validating their role in his narrative and cementing the rapper not just as a musician, but as a harbinger of collective consciousness.

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