Violent Crimes by Kanye West Lyrics Meaning – A Deep Dive into Parenthood’s Wake-Up Call


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Kanye West's Violent Crimes at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning

Lyrics

Fallin’, dreamin’, talkin’ in your sleep
I know you want to cry all night, all night
Plottin’, schemin’, finding
Reason to defend all of your violent nights
Promise me you will see

Don’t you grow up in a hurry, your mom’ll be worried, aw
It was all part of the story, even the scary nights
Thank you for all of the glory, you will be remembered, aw
Thank you to all of the heroes of the night (night, night)
They gotta repeat the colors, the lie is wearin’ off
Reality is upon us, colors drippin’ off
Colors drippin’ off

Niggas is savage, niggas is monsters
Niggas is pimps, niggas is players
‘Til niggas have daughters, now they precautious
Father forgive me, I’m scared of the karma
‘Cause now I see women as somethin’ to nurture
Not somethin’ to conquer
I hope she like Nicki, I’ll make her a monster
Not havin’ menages
I’m just being silly
I answered the door, like Will Smith and Martin
Nigga do we have a problem?
Matter of fact Marlin, this ain’t Meet the Fockers
I’ll beat his ass, pray I beat the charges
No daddy don’t play, not when it come to they daughters
Don’t do no yoga, don’t do pilates
Just play piano and stick to karate
I pray your body’s draped more like mine and not like your mommy’s
Just bein’ salty, but niggas is nuts
And I am a nigga, I know what they want
I pray that you don’t get it all at once
Curves under your dress, I know it’s pervs all on the ‘net
All in the comments, you wanna vomit
That’s your baby, you love her to death
Now she cuttin’ class and hangin’ with friends
You break a glass and say it again
She can’t comprehend the danger she’s in
If you whoop her ass, she move in with him
Then he whoop her ass, you go through it again
But how you the devil rebukin’ the sin?
Let’s pray we can put this behind us
I swear that these times is the wildest
She got the scars, they serve as reminders
Blood still on her pajamas, but yesterday is dead, yeah
Moment of silence
Next she’ll be off to college
And then at the altar
‘Cause she know that niggas is savage
Niggas is monsters
Niggas is pimps, niggas is players
‘Til niggas have daughters
Niggas is pimps, niggas is players
‘Til niggas have daughters

Don’t you grow up in a hurry, your mom’ll be worried, aw
It was all part of the story, even the scary nights
Thank you for all of the glory, you will be remembered, aw
Thank you to all of the heroes of the night (night, night)
They gotta repeat the colors, the light is wearin’ off
Reality is upon us, colors drippin’ off
Colors drippin’ off

I’m sayin’ it like
I want a daughter like Nicki
Aww man, I promise
I’ma turn her to a monster, but no menagés
I don’t know how you saying it, but let ’em hear this

Full Lyrics

Nestled within Kanye West’s repertoire is ‘Violent Crimes’, a track that resonates with a blend of raw emotion, heavy introspection, and striking vulnerability. This poignant offering from his album ‘Ye’ stirs up a dialogue far beyond the rhythm and rhymes, plunging into the complexities of fatherhood, the transformation of personal perspectives, and the confronting nature of self-awareness.

At first glance, ‘Violent Crimes’ feels like a personal letter from West to his daughter, yet the layers entwined within each verse craft a universal story that holds a mirror to societal views on women and the profound change that parenting invokes in an individual’s psyche.

The Transformation from Player to Protector

Wrapped within the lyrics of ‘Violent Crimes’, West sheds light on an archetypal transformation experienced by many men upon the arrival of a daughter. He candidly documents his shift from viewing women as conquests to individuals worthy of nurture and protection. It’s an admission of past mistakes, a confession that many natures considered ‘savage’ metamorphose once the responsibility of fatherhood sets in.

Further into the song, West emphasizes the instinctual protective streak that flares up as he navigates his daughter’s upbringing, revealing the inherent dilemma of reconciling one’s past behaviors with the hopes and fears for one’s child. It’s a struggle between acceptance and fear, poignantly presented as a battle with his own history and habits.

Breaking Down the Gendered Stereotypes

Kanye doesn’t shy away from the double standards ingrained in society, as is evident with lines like ‘I pray your body’s draped more like mine and not like your mommy’s’. Here, he grapples with the uncomfortable truth that a woman’s physique can unfairly define her experience in the world, a world often laced with unwelcome attention and objectification.

The mutability of perspective, as a girl transitions from ‘treasure’ to ‘target’ in the eyes of the world, is starkly represented. West challenges these gendered stereotypes, advocating for a future where his daughter is judged not by her appearance but by her character and abilities.

Duality of Influence: The Impact of Online Presence

Referencing the online world with ‘Curves under your dress, I know it’s pervs all on the ‘net’, Kanye speaks to the shared anxiety of modern parents — the vast digital landscape where one’s image can attract both admiration and unsolicited commentary. This line serves as a cautious reminder of how the internet can serve as a breeding ground for the sinister, and how each post can ripple through cyberspace, often with unintended consequences.

The duality of the internet as a place for connection and dehumanization is addressed, prompting us to reflect on the role of social media in shaping young minds and the physical dangers that can ensue when online interactions take a dark turn.

A Father’s Preemptive Regret and Healing

West’s internal dialogue, ‘Father, forgive me, I’m scared of the karma’, is especially poignant, implying that the seeds of past misdeeds may sprout in his daughter’s journey. It exposes the fear that dominates any parent’s mind — the fear of one’s own wrongdoings being visited upon their children — and the desperate pleas to avoid that anticipated pain.

However, West’s subsequent plea for forgiveness and a fresh start, mirrored in ‘Let’s pray we can put this behind us’, suggests an understanding that yesterday’s errors need not dictate today’s lives. It’s an appeal for healing and moving forward with a newfound appreciation for the gravity of his role as a parent.

Unraveling the Song’s Veiled Indictment

Beneath the intimate reflections and fatherly concerns in ‘Violent Crimes’ lies a besieged critique of the very culture that births the ‘pimps’ and ‘players’. West questions and condemns the pattern of glorifying behaviors that become abhorrent when one realizes their impact on one’s own flesh and blood.

The systematic issues that embolden misogyny and violence towards women are not overtly dissected, but the subtext is clear: there’s a need to introspect and actively reverse the toxic cycles that persist in society. It’s a hidden challenge to the listener to dismantle the destructive archetypes before they ensnare another generation.

Quote-Worthy Confessions and Cultural Commentary

Lines such as ‘Niggas is pimps, niggas is players, ‘Til niggas have daughters’ resonate not just as a personal realization but also as a cultural commentary. They echo the familiar refrains in hip hop, evolving over time to reflect personal growth and the stark reality of societal attitudes towards women.

Other lines like ‘Reality is upon us, colors drippin’ off’ poetically underscore the shedding of illusions as parenthood strips away facades, leaving raw truths exposed. It’s these memorable lines that anchor West’s narrative, cementing ‘Violent Crimes’ as a notable entry in his exploration of life’s complex canvas.

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