Doja – Decoding the Cultural Reflections and Bold Statements


You can view the lyrics, alternate interprations and sheet music for Central Cee's Doja at Lyrics.org.
Article Contents:
  1. Music Video
  2. Lyrics
  3. Song Meaning
  4. Tackling Taboos with Wordplay: Unpacking the Homophobia Assertion
  5. Name-Dropping Doja Cat: Between Odes and Objectification
  6. Unearthing the Hidden Meaning: Success and Sacrifice in the Spotlight
  7. Beyond the Party Anthems: A Reflection on Fame and Identity
  8. The Memorable Lines: When the Trap Beats Meet Festive Cheer

Lyrics

How can I be homophobic? My bitch is gay
Hit man in the top, try see a man topless, even the stick is gay
Huggin’ my bruddas and say that I love them but I don’t swing that way
The mandem celebrate Eid, the trap still runnin’ on Christmas Day

Somebody tell Doja Cat that I’m tryna indulge in that
In my grey tracksuit, see the bulge in that
See the motion clap when you’re throwin’ it back
These females plannin’ on doin’ me wrong
So I’m grabbin’ a ‘dom out the Trojan pack
Post the location after we’re gone
Can’t slip and let them know where we’re at
I don’t know about you but I value my life (but I value my life)
‘Cause imagine I die (die)
And I ain’t made a hundred M’s yet
There’s so much things I ain’t done yet
Like fuckin’ a flight attendant, huh
I don’t party but I heard Cardi there
So fuck it, I might attend it
Gotta kick back sometimes and wonder
How life would’ve been if I never did take them risks
And would have I prospered?
Floatin’ and I won’t go under
Been outta town for a month
Absence made the love grow fonder
UK rap or UK drill
Gotta mention my name if you talk ’bout the genre (alright)

Ho-ho-how can I be homophobic? (My bitch is gay)
Hit man in the top, try see a man topless, even the stick is gay
Huggin’ my bruddas and say that I love them but I don’t swing that way (way)
The mandem celebrate Eid, the trap still runnin’ on Christmas Day
Ho-ho-how can I be homophobic? My bitch is gay
Hit man in the top, try see a man topless, even the stick is gay
Huggin’ my bruddas and say that I love them but I don’t swing that way (way)
The mandem celebrate Eid, the trap still runnin’ on Christmas Day

Full Lyrics

In the vibrant landscape of modern hip-hop, few artists capture the zeitgeist quite like Central Cee and his compelling new track ‘Doja.’ At first listen, it may appear to be another addition to the bustling UK drill scene, but a deep dive into the lyrics unveils layers of complexity, juxtaposing personal assertions with cultural commentary.

Central Cee, often praised for his clever wordplay and sharp observations, uses ‘Doja’ to paint a picture of his own experiences and perspectives, navigating themes of sexuality, success, and the relentless nature of the music industry. The track emerges as a bold statement, provoking thought while delivering an infectious beat that anchors it firmly in the playlists of his growing fan base.

Tackling Taboos with Wordplay: Unpacking the Homophobia Assertion

One of the most striking verses in ‘Doja’ challenges societal norms with bravado and wit. ‘How can I be homophobic? My bitch is gay,’ declares Central Cee, shedding light on the often whispered topic of sexuality in hip-hop. In doing so, he not only deflects accusations of homophobia but also challenges the hypermasculine personas that often dominate the genre.

The rapper’s play on words continues, ‘Hit man in the top, try see a man topless, even the stick is gay,’ turning aggressive lyrics on their head with a double entendre that can be interpreted as both confrontational and self-aware. It’s provocative rhyming, designed to disarm and reframe the discussion on masculinity in urban music.

Name-Dropping Doja Cat: Between Odes and Objectification

Central Cee’s mention of Doja Cat is as audacious as it is a nod to popular culture, elevating the song’s subject from personal narrative to public commentary. ‘Somebody tell Doja Cat that I’m tryna indulge in that,’ he raps, expressing a desire that appears superficial yet hints at the pervasive nature of celebrity infatuations.

However, there’s an underlying critique of how female artists are perceived and treated, a duality that Central Cee navigates with recognition of his complicity. The lyrics confront the listener with their own voyeuristic tendencies and the industry’s role in perpetuating these narratives.

Unearthing the Hidden Meaning: Success and Sacrifice in the Spotlight

Beneath the bravura and beats of ‘Doja’ lies a contemplative insight into Central Cee’s psyche. ‘I don’t know about you but I value my life,’ he contemplates, contrasting his hunger for success with the very real dangers that his lifestyle engenders.

The artist meditates on the what-ifs of life, weighing the risks he’s taken against the prosperity they’ve brought. It’s a moment of vulnerability that underscores the relentless pressure and sacrifices demanded by fame. These introspective verses serve as a poignant reminder of the personal costs tethered to the pursuit of ‘a hundred M’s.’

Beyond the Party Anthems: A Reflection on Fame and Identity

In ‘Doja,’ Central Cee’s lyrics about partying with the likes of Cardi B play into the fantasy of pop culture, yet he’s quick to distance himself from the frivolity, ‘I don’t party but I heard Cardi there / So fuck it, I might attend it.’

Through these lines, he acknowledges the allure of celebrity while retaining his individuality and priorities. The acknowledgment isn’t just observational; it’s a declaration of self, asserting his place within the cultural milieu while remaining apart from it.

The Memorable Lines: When the Trap Beats Meet Festive Cheer

The chorus of ‘Doja’ hooks listeners with its incongruity, ‘The mandem celebrate Eid, the trap still runnin’ on Christmas Day.’ Here, Central Cee serves an authentic slice of life, merging the personal with the universal, drawing from the diverse cultural tapestry that defines him.

As a Muslim-raised artist in the predominantly Christian West, Central Cee’s lines acknowledge his dual identity and narrate an experience that straddles religious lines, capturing a truth for many navigating the complexities of multi-cultural upbringing. It’s a celebratory yet stark reminder that for some, the grind doesn’t pause for holiday cheer, a poignant note in an otherwise exuberant track.

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